Muscle Sparing Tram Flap in Washington, D.C.

What is Muscle Sparing Tram Flap?

TRAM flap, standing for transverse rectus abdominus myocutaneous, is a breast reconstruction technique using the patient’s own tissue. The muscle Sparing (MS) TRAM flap uses skin, fat, and muscle from the abdominal area, but uses less muscle than a free TRAM flap.

The Benefits of MS Tram Flap

The MS TRAM flap technique takes less muscle than the free TRAM flap, allowing for less risk of abdominal weakness. The autologous technique offers a natural look and feel to the new breast. Because tissue is taken from the abdominal area, women can also experience a flattened abdominal, similar to tummy tuck results.

Who is a Candidate?

To be a successful candidate for MS TRAM Flap, patients must have enough abdominal tissue present to rebuild the breast mound. Those who have had a previous abdominal procedure such as a tummy tuck might not be candidates for this procedure. The MS TRAM flap is effective for those who want little muscle removal.

The Procedure

During MS TRAM flap reconstruction, skin, fat, and some muscle is removed from the rectus abdominus in the lower abdominal. Along with the muscle taken, blood vessels are also transferred and microsurgery is used to reconnect them. The new tissue forms the breast mound, while nipple reconstruction and tattooing can complete the restoration.

Results and Recovery

Patients will be required to take time off from work and normal activities to recover properly. Some swelling, bruising, and soreness in the breast and the donor site can be expected. Movements that could put a strain on the breast muscle or the abdominal area should be avoided. Patients will be provided with a complete list of post-op care instructions and physical restrictions.

After breast reconstruction with the MS TRAM flap technique, patients might experience some abdominal muscle weakness. A scar similar to one after a tummy tuck will also be present below the waistline but will continue to fade with time.